Money, Possessions and Eternity by Randy Alcorn - A book review

One day I will look back on 2015 and say to myself that was the year we had our minds blown and perspectives shifted as we studied the book Money, Possessions and Eternity. Some may suggest I live a fairly boring life but it is rather that the experience has been so life changing that it will no doubt form part of the highlights package of 2015!

The journey began when friends of ours invited my wife and I to join them as they re-read Money Possessions and Eternity, which had profoundly shaped a great deal of their thinking about money and generosity. We agreed to meet over 10 weeks. Each week we would prepare by reading two to three chapters of the book in order to discuss the issues that particularly challenged or inspired us. The benefit of reading, praying and studying the book together meant we could not only hold each other accountable to what God was saying to us personally, but also that we could share stories of our journey with money and generosity.

Money is often a topic which we shy away from, it is something which we keep a secret and often do not discuss. But money is important as the book reminds us in the first chapter - the author, Randy Alcorn, points out that 2,350 verses in the bible speak on the topic of money (more than any other topic in the bible by a long way). This showed us that God does not shy away from the topic and our fruitful and transformative discussions reminded us that we, as the church, need to continually engage with the topic of money. 

As the name suggests Money, Possessions and Eternity is about money – but more than that, it is about power, control, it is about faith, it is about pride and greed, it is about the danger of materialism as well as our attitudes and mind sets which we have been fed by the prevailing culture of our time, often without even knowing it. Randy Alcorn reminds us that money is just a valuable piece of paper. So when we started unpacking our motivations and attitudes towards this piece of paper, only then, did we start having the real, honest and challenging conversations needed, for us to be changed through the process.   

Randy Alcorn has written a gem which is not only littered with quotations and scriptures but is also filled with personal stories and practical advice which makes the book easy to follow and very applicable. But be warned the book is also incredibly challenging, and can leave you at times a little uncomfortable. After all how do we sugar coat Jesus allowing the rich young ruler to walk away from salvation because he could not give everything away, or how do we hear the call not to store up for ourselves treasure on this earth but rather in Heaven? With chapters like; Tithing: the training wheels for giving, The dangers of materialism, Giving: Reciprocating God’s Grace, Helping the Poor and Reaching the Lost, you will be left feeling sufficiently challenged to at least look at your own life and start asking some pretty honest questions. 

Randy Alcorn is not scared of attempting to answer some of those really difficult questions which include things like; should we give everything away, should we as Christians have insurance, go into debt, save our money and have retirement plans? What does storing up our treasure in Heaven actually mean? Who does our money belong to and what are we leaving behind? 

There were times when, my wife and I, whilst reading through the book needed to put it down and discuss what was written and what God was saying to us. One particular moment was after having read this quotation by CS Lewis, “I do not believe we can settle how much we ought to give. I am afraid the only safe rule is to give more than we can spare. In other words, if our expenditure on comforts, luxuries, amusements, etc., is up to the standard common among those with the same income as our own, we are probably giving away too little. If our charities do not at all pinch or hamper us, I should say they are too small. There ought to be things we should like to do and cannot do because our charitable expenditure excludes them.”

What we have realised through this journey is that we need to allow the questions to guide us and that we cannot walk this journey alone. The questions are important in lifting the lid on the things we would prefer to hide and the relationships are vital in helping us stay on course.

My only regret is that I had not read this book sooner.

Mark van Deventer
Trustee and friend of The Warehouse

 

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